Category Archives: News

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Why hygienic design of bearings is key to food safety

Category : News , Technical Articles

An emphasis on the hygiene element of the design of equipment can play an important role in controlling the safety of food products manufactured. However, applying this too broadly without focussing specifically on the hygienic design of the components part of the system, can potentially risk the spread of bacteria trapped within bearings, says Davide Zanghi, the person responsible for the Hygienic design office in SKF.

Hygienic design considers specifically how problems such as corrosion, lubricant leakage, cleaning and self-drying could adversely affect food safety – and applies design principles to solve the problem. In essence, it is a design philosophy applied through dedicated and specific rules. Just as ergonomic design pays close attention to the physical needs of product users, hygienic design has a laser focus on preventing issues of food contamination.

The European Hygienic Engineering and Design Group (EHEDG) aims to promote safe food by improving the standard of hygienic engineering and design, and includes equipment manufacturers, food companies and research institutes among its members. In November 2016, in Denmark, it ran its biennial World Congress. On this occasion, SKF – an EHEDG member since 2006 – highlighted its long record using these design principles.
Design principles – a dim view on bearing components

In general, EHEDG guidelines consider bearings an easy place to trap food particles and water and therefore these are seen as potential breeding grounds for harbouring bacteria. The advice is: keep bearings well away from food product contact areas.

This is very much the case with recent guidelines on hygienic design of belt conveyors for the food industry, where EHEDG addresses two of the major challenges in safe food production: how to avoid contamination of food through inadequately designed processing equipment and how to improve food safety without raising operating costs for cleaning and production hygiene. Even if lots of attention goes on systems design and major components such as belts; bearing and bearing units consistently have a low profile within the overall hygienic system design.

However, even if not in direct contact with the food zone, bearings are often in the proximity of food product and with high pressure water or dry cleaning regimes they pose the risk that bacteria – if present – can get airborne and potentially contaminate the food product.

In order to minimize the risk of contamination, designing bearings with hygienic design principles in mind is a key consideration. One of the most important principles underpinning hygienic design is the ability to clean effectively. This may be easy to understand, but it is often difficult to achieve in practice, for bearings and bearing units. For a start, the products should be made from non-corrosive and non-porous materials, such as stainless steel, or composites and with shapes that are cleanable, allowing self-draining. Bearing units should have filled bases, which removes cavities where germs may fester.

In general materials used such as elastomers and composite and grease should be compliant with food safety directives and regulations. In all instances, potential of grease leakage onto the food product during operation should be avoided.

Ideally, bearing units should have effective end covers – that prevent process contaminants and cleaning fluids from entering the bearing units cavity and, at the same time, allow a frequent visual inspection.

Other relevant areas are:

• avoid metal to metal contacts in between unit components and in between units and attaching surfaces
• avoid re-lubrication as much as possible
• achieve high service life despite of very demanding operating and cleaning regimes

Hygienic design applies to food production and packaging machinery in its entirety. But dealing specifically with one of the most problematic components – bearings – can only help to improve the overall risk strategy.

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SKF builds to last: 3 000 tonnes of concrete anchor large size bearing test centre in Germany

Category : Announcements , News

SKF is currently building the world’s most powerful large size bearing test centre on its Schweinfurt ‘Werk 3’ site. This pioneering project is now one major step nearer completion – weighing in at around 3 000 tonnes, it took just two days to cast the foundations for the larger of the two new test rigs.

Around nine metres wide, six metres deep and 22 metres long, the pit that had to be filled for the base of the future SKF test rig was the size of two detached houses. It had to be filled quickly to ensure the concrete could set correctly.

Over the course of 19 hours, 150 mixer trucks brought in their load and discharged it in the pit, practically one vehicle every six minutes; so almost as if on a conveyor belt. “Obviously this was a logistical challenge,” says Armin Schaab of SKF’s Construction and Factory Planning team, “but quite clearly our detailed advance planning paid dividends. In addition, the entire team put in a magnificent effort on site, with everything running like clockwork and no incidents of note. This meant we were able to cast the 1 200 cubic metres as planned.”

The base is such a huge block because of the enormous forces likely to be unleashed by the test rig that will be anchored to it. The colossus among test rigs is intended in particular for the testing of gigantic rolling bearings for wind power. “It will be the first test rig in the world capable of testing not just a single main bearing but a complete bearing unit all at once,” says SKF’s Senior Vice President, Technology Development Bernd Stephan, hinting at the dimensions of this unique installation. “The bearings themselves can have an external diameter of anything up to six metres, being intended for turbines in the 10 megawatt class. The test rig can subject structures of that kind to dynamic forces in all directions that, when combined, are many times greater than on the strongest test installation currently available.”

Quite apart from that, the future test rig will also allow rotational speeds on testing that will be considerably higher than currently available. Using these exceptional capabilities, SKF wants to simulate extreme dynamic loads of the order of several meganewtons or meganewton metres in as realistic a manner as possible. In view of power capacity of this order, the engineers from RENK Test System GmbH, the firm entrusted with the development, even had to come up with a special fixing method that would direct the forces exerted on the station in a controlled manner along the correct paths.

“We are making these efforts because the existing computational simulation models simply aren’t capable of making truly realistic prognoses,” says Dr Martin Göbel, Manager of the test centre project at SKF in Schweinfurt. “Our two new test rigs will provide a remedy in this respect and give us insights into processes that were previously inaccessible. The relevant findings will make the new test centre a pioneering instrument in helping many customers from a wide variety of industries gain access to an energy-efficient future in a way that is tailored to the application in question.”

“In the final analysis, the 360 MSEK investment in the new test centre will help us customise large size bearings to their subsequent uses much more precisely and efficiently than has previously been possible,” says Manfred E. Neubert, President of SKF GmbH. “This means that our customers benefit from significantly higher levels of robustness and reliability in the new generation of large size bearings.” For SKF itself, the new test centre is like one of those final pieces in a puzzle soon to be completed, adding to the expertise in large size bearings already available on the Schweinfurt site.

Follow the construction of the world’s most powerful large size bearing test centre: http://skf-download.de/pruefzentrum/cam1en.php.

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Construction industry lies at the base of the world economy

Category : Announcements , News

Be it residential, commercial, heavy, civil or industrial edifice, they all require reliable heavy duty machinery and long term, trouble free functioning. JTEKT supplies both standard and customised Koyo products to serve those demanding applications.

The construction industry may be showing a differential growth pattern all over the world, nonetheless the use of modern technologies is always a must in order to assure reliability and efficiency.

Construction machinery designed for high performance in extreme harsh environments calls for bearings which can withstand these working conditions and at the same time guarantee proper functioning over a long time span. At JTEKT we follow the latest developments in the construction industry closely and our bearings are designed in order to meet up with the demands of this industry.

Experience and capabilities

JTEKT products are present in construction vehicles and equipment, whether in their drivetrain, in their power units or in their accessories. Typical applications are planetary gear reducers, steering systems, pumps and driveshaft. The unbeatable quality of our products and their specific designs allow our customers to guarantee superior performance to the end users under the extreme operating conditions (temperature, pollution, etc.) of those applications.

Products:

  • Tapered roller bearings
  • Cylindrical roller bearings
  • Spherical roller bearings
  • Solid race needle bearings
  • Cylindrical roller bearings
  • Cage & Roller assemblies
  • Universal joint bearings
  • Needle rollers sets
  • Thrust bearings
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Going circular: The next industrial revolution?

Category : Announcements , News

The benefits of recycling, reusing and re-manufacturing have been promoted for years. But today, the practice has evolved from one of environmental responsibility to a model for the future of industry and world economies. It’s called the “circular economy” and is viewed by many as the next industrial revolution.

The circular economy aims to almost eliminate waste by using products, parts and raw materials for as long as possible. Proponents see the model as having tremendous global advantages, offering a solution to population growth, dwindling natural resources and climate change.

Researchers and scientists view it as an absolute necessity, as elements, including gold, silver and tungsten could be exhausted in the next 50 years. Other resources, such as crude oil, are getting harder and more expensive, to extract. Commodity prices are increasingly volatile and environmental degradation is impacting the food supply.

Bringing the circular economy to reality will require the reorganisation of how the world produces and consumes. Changes will include designing products to last longer, and in a way that allows raw materials and components to be stripped out when the product has reach the end of its service life. Using renewable resources, reusing and recycling excess resources, and buying and selling services instead of products would also be standard procedure.

Leading business and industrial leaders are already buying in. French automaker Renault, fashion retailer H&M, and telecommunications giant Vodafone have introduced  “circularity” into their business models.  Other companies are sure to follow.  Could your organisation benefit?

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New SKF grease cuts false brinelling damage in half

Category : Announcements , News

The innovative anti-false brinelling grease for hub bearing units from SKF reduces friction and wear significantly, while improving bearing performance.

SKF has launched a new grease that has been proven to reduce the damage caused by false brinelling in hub bearing units by more than 50 per cent when compared with competing greases. The lubricant has been introduced to the market to help overcome this wear phenomenon and can also enable overall improvements in vehicle efficiency by limiting fretting corrosion and the micro-damages caused by vibration.

Designed for use with both new designs and retrofits, the grease is fully compatible with bearing components materials and came out as the best performing lubricant for reducing the raceway micro-damages caused by false brinelling when tested alongside several other standard greases.

In particular, this solution was shown to lead to a consistent improvement in bearing robustness against the micro-damages in the raceways that often occur during vehicle transportation by rail or truck, for example. In addition, the grease maintains the performance level of the hub bearing unit, including service life.

Roberto Galante, Manager of Advanced Development Wheel End at SKF, said: “With the ability to cut false brinelling damage in half, this grease will play a vital role in helping OEMs to ensure that the micro-damages caused by ball-raceway contact in hub bearing units during vehicle transportation will not exceed the strict thresholds specified by automotive companies. Furthermore, the lubricant maintains the same bearing qualities for consistently optimal reliability and performance.”

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20 years NKE Austria

Category : News

Steyr, Austria, October 2016. Bearing manufacturer NKE Austria GmbH is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. Based in the Austrian city of Steyr, the company was founded in 1996 by Heimo Ebner and Harald Zerobin, both previously leading employees of former bearing manufacturer Steyr Wälzlager. NKE produces standard and special bearings for all industrial applications, with engineering, product development, production, final parts processing and assembly, quality assurance, logistics, sales and marketing being centralised at its Steyr headquarters. The bearings are distributed through 12 international representative offices and 240 distribution outlets in 60 countries.

bild-1-nke-ebner-witzler-zerobin_web
NKE founders Heimo Ebner (left) and Harald Zerobin (right) with General Manager Thomas Witzler

In its first ten years, NKE experienced rapid, constant growth, with its turnover increasing on average by more than 20 percent a year. As early as 1996 its employees numbered about 80. To keep up with the growth, the company’s premises in Steyr-Gleink were expanded several times, but still proved too small. Consequently, new premises were completed in the Stadtgut Steyr business park in 2009. The new premises, in which NKE invested more than 15 million euros, had a building area of 10,000 m². As well as doubling the production capacity, the relocation facilitated a greater vertical integration and more efficient logistics. Despite the financial crisis, NKE increased in turnover in 2009 while its number of employees grew to 200. An important growth sector in this respect was wind energy, with China as the number one growth market. It was in the same year that NKE opened its first Chinese sales office in Shanghai. In the end, however, the global financial crisis did not pass NKE by without leaving its mark: today, staffing levels are down to 120. With the aim of uniting strengths and expertise and taking advantage of synergies, Spanish bearing manufacturer Fersa Bearings, which is specialised in the automotive sector, acquired an interest of 49 percent in NKE in 2016. The resulting group of companies boasts three production sites, five distribution centres, and three research and development locations.

bild-2-nke-austria-in-steyr_1200_web
The NKE headquarters in business park Stadtgut Steyr.

After guiding the company for 20 years, its two founders and former General Managers Heimo Ebner and Harald Zerobin passed the company’s management on to Thomas Witzler in July 2016. With their many years’ expertise and experience they continue to be active in NKE, dealing with strategic planning within the company. “It is with pleasure and a little pride that we look back on the past two decades, in which we have succeeded, together with our staff, in establishing NKE as a manufacturer of premium bearings” says Harald Zerobin. “With the reorganisation we can now invest more time in strategic topics to shape and plan the next 20 years.” Regarding his future plans for the company, the new General Manager Thomas Witzler says: “Our aim is to continue our success story of the past 20 years. We will increase our focus on technical solutions, not least as a partner in the development of smart bearing solutions. Initial confirmed customer projects and feedback are already showing that we are on the right path. In addition, we have been able to bring ‘Advanced Engineering’ – the development engineering department for the entire group of companies – to our Steyr headquarters. In five years we want to make 20 percent of our sales with products that haven’t even been developed yet.”

About NKE Austria:
NKE Austria GmbH is a bearing manufacturer with headquarters in Steyr, Austria. The company was founded in 1996 by a group of senior staff members of former company Steyr Wälzlager. NKE offers both standard and special bearings for all industrial applications. Engineering, product development, production and final processing of components, assembly, quality assurance, logistics, and sales and marketing are centralised at its Steyr headquarters. The factory in Steyr is certified to ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004 and OHSAS 18001. NKE’s products are distributed through 12 international representative offices and more than 240 distribution outlets in over 60 countries.

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Driving the green revolution

Category : News

Now that the dust has settled on the COP21 meeting held in Paris in late 2015, it’s time to roll up our sleeves and plot a way forward, says Rob Jenkinson, Director of Corporate Sustainability at SKF, who shares his personal views on sustainability and the impact the COP21 will have on the industry

While politicians, diplomats and other high-ranking dignitaries have made promises and commitments, and agreed challenging targets, it is industry that will do the spadework by putting many of these commitments into practice – from improving energy efficiency to investing in low carbon technologies.

Industry will play a massive role in transforming our carbon-based world – that is wasteful with energy – into one that generates energy without any greenhouse gases, while using it much more efficiently.

It will require investment, and commitment, with innovation driving the growth of both new and established technologies. It will encompass everything from system changes – such as renewable energy sources and electric vehicles – to lower level operational improvements, such as more efficient pumps and motors, and better maintenance and reliability. As engineers, we love a challenge – so will be leading from the front on this.

This is not to belittle the contribution of government. The Paris meeting was an important milestone, in that so many nations reached an agreement to restrict future temperature rises to less than 2 degrees C. Now, with an agreement in place, these governments must enact sensible and challenging legislation – with appropriate incentives and penalties – that underpins the effort to reduce carbon emissions.

Legislation is a crucial driver for sustainability. The European automotive industry, for example, has slashed carbon emissions – mainly because tough legislation demands this. In similar ways, the stimulus of feed-in tariffs for solar or wind energy, and increasingly stringent emissions legislation were also vital in moving the sustainability agenda forward.

While the Paris meeting was an overall success, they didn’t get everything right: the agreements could have been legally binding and they could have done much more to put a global carbon pricing market in place.

I think that a globally connected set of carbon markets is an absolute necessity for the future – and is a distinct possibility. For now, we have isolated and poorly functioning carbon pricing schemes in different regions. Fixing them and hooking them together would help ensure that there is a level playing field for everybody and accelerate the rate of change An effective and sufficient global carbon price could make many things possible – including carbon capture and storage, which could avoid carbon emissions from combustion by storing  them  deep underground where it cannot contribute to climate change.

In reality, there is no single solution to the problem of climate change – so we need to work on many fronts at the same time.

Agreeing to a massive cut in emissions, as was achieved in Paris, may seem to be a nightmare for industry. It is actually an opportunity – tempered by risk – that will require a fundamental shift in thinking.

Look at the hard savings that can be gained from introducing energy efficiency measures; or at the top-line growth of companies that understand this – such as Tesla.

There are generally four types of company when it comes to climate change: those who do and say nothing – though, among larger companies, this is fast disappearing; those who say something but do very little – which might work as PR in the short-term, but ends up being more costly in the long run; those that are genuinely committed to carbon saving and energy efficiency – but restrict this to their own operations; and those for whom sustainability stretches beyond their own organisation.

At SKF, we try as hard as we can to be in this fourth category with BeyondZero as the strategic framework with which we drive and communicate all the various initiatives needed to do this. BeyondZero addresses both the opportunity to reduce carbon and cost related to our own operations and those of our suppliers, logistics etc. At the same time bringing more and more innovative solutions to our customers that help them (and society) do the same. For example, we work with our suppliers to drive improved energy efficiency, in an attempt to shrink not only the footprint of our direct operations but also up the value chain.

Within our own operations we have had a relentless focus on energy efficiency: between 2006 and 2014, we slashed total energy use by 16%, while growing our business by more than 34%. Yes, it’s part of our BeyondZero pledge to reduce our footprint – but it has saved us the equivalent of SEK200m each year. That’s a real example to dispel the myth that sustainability always goes hand in hand with higher costs.

Of course, the endgame is a full-scale transition away from fossil fuels – especially coal – and towards a ‘low carbon’ economy that sees low carbon and renewable energy sources gradually take over. It will take time – 20 or 30 years at least – but we need to start that journey now, and deliver the reductions needed in the short-to-medium term. We can do this by rapidly increasing the efficiency with which we use energy in industry and society – and there are already many ways to do this.

Variable speed drives can reduce the energy consumption of a motor by around 30%. Fifteen or 20 years ago, VSDs were seen as a luxury. Now, they are widely used and are delivering lower energy bills for large swathes of the manufacturing sector. Companies that have bought VSDs are saving on their electricity bills – and are prepared for ever-tightening legislation, as they are working ahead of the curve on sustainability.

Another example would be to switch standard ball bearings to the E2 (energy efficient) equivalents. The reason is simple: friction. E2 bearings have been redesigned to reduce friction while maintaining life and can cut bearing losses by 30%. Multiply this across the industry and you have lower electricity bills. When lots of apparently small actions like this combined  it can have a very large effect.

The manufacturing industry will be at the forefront of making and enabling these kinds of practical changes. If the transformation is to take place with sufficient scale and speed, industry must see a value to making these changes, and recognise the risk of standing still. If companies want to be part of the transformation – and profit from it, rather than suffer by it – they need to act now.

* To be included in the BeyondZero portfolio, SKF products, services and solutions must be demonstrated to deliver significant environmental benefits to the customer, without significant environmental trade-offs elsewhere in the product life cycle.

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New Alfa Romeo Giulia rolls on SKF hub bearing units

Category : News

SKF supplies wheel hub bearing units for FCA’s newly launched Alfa Romeo Giulia

Gothenburg, Sweden, 27 September 2016: The SKF HBU3 units selected for the FCA’s recently launched Alfa Romeo Giulia offer a range of compelling advantages over conventional wheel bearing designs. These include faster, more straightforward assembly and a longer service life. Bearing preload is set during the manufacture of the units, minimizing clearance and guaranteeing exceptionally low levels of noise and vibration.

Beyond improved reliability, drivers will benefit from improved ride and handling, especially in corners, thanks to the high stiffness imparted by SKF’s HBU3 raceway geometry.

Stephane Le Mounier, President, SKF Automotive Market, says, “FCA is a strategic partner for SKF and we are proud to be a supplier for their new Giorgio platform, to which Alfa Romeo now will launch a series of car models. The SKF wheel bearings have been designed to support the offered driving pleasure with the new Giulia. Our long and close cooperation has a strong foundation to where we build value together for the car owners. We do it with a focus to reduce friction and weight for minimizing the impact on the environment. Sustainability is a strong driver for both our companies.”

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SKF at IZB: helping the automotive industry meet the challenges of electric powertrains

Category : News

Advanced materials, deep application expertise and innovative component designs support the development of new electric and hybrid powertrains

Gothenburg, Sweden, 23 September 2016: At the International Suppliers fair (IZB) in Wolfsburg, Germany from 18 to 20 October 2016, SKF will showcase a range of solutions developed to meet the demands of automotive electric powertrains.

Pure electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid vehicles are reaching the automotive mainstream. By 2020, higher production volumes and technological advances will mean electric vehicles are likely to be cost-competitive with their gasoline equivalents. By 2040, electric vehicles may account for 35 per cent of new car sales1.

For the industry, the electrification of automotive powertrains represents the biggest technological shift for a generation. Expertise from SKF is helping leading automotive OEMs and suppliers tackle many of the challenges they are encountering along the way.

SKF eDrive ball bearings, for example, have been developed specifically to address the need for consistently low friction, high speed and high power density in EV and hybrid vehicle electric machines. The bearings use the SKF-patented energy efficient E2 polymer cage, optimized raceway geometry, and a validated long life, wide temperature grease. Combined, these advanced design features help enable longer drive system service life and extend battery range.

Hybrid bearings, which combine steel rings with rolling elements made of bearing grade silicon nitride, have a number of advantages in EV applications. In addition to a longer service life and improved resistance to vibration, these bearings also have excellent electrical insulation characteristics, protecting drivetrain components from damage caused by stray electrical currents.

SKF has also developed a range of bearing units with integrated sensors that simplify assembly and improve reliability in electric powertrain applications. SKF Rotor Positioning Sensor-Bearing Units, for example, use a patented design that allows very precise management of the sensor-bearing unit air gap. As a result, the units are insensitive to severe magnetic field disturbances, and can withstand application vibration and continuous temperatures up to 150°C.

SKF EV and hybrid vehicle solutions can be fully customized to suit the needs of specific customer vehicle and powertrain programs, and SKF’s experienced application engineers are able to offer intensive support from initial development through to series production.

1http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-ev-oil-crisis/

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SKF launches Marine Route Based Kit at Posidonia 2016

Category : Announcements , News

SKF has launched a sophisticated condition monitoring system with cloud connectivity to cut downtime and increase fleet reliability through enabling predictive maintenance in the marine sector. Introduced to the market for the first time at Posidonia 2016, the SKF Marine CM Route Kit, includes all the tools needed to implement reliable condition monitoring techniques onboard ships and allows operators to adopt an integrated approach to condition based maintenance on their entire fleet.

The kit, which includes the SKF Microlog handheld monitoring device and dedicated marine software with marine typical equipment models, can be used on all kind of vessels, as well as offshore platforms to collect data on machine and component condition. For each asset it will gauge the overall vibration levels and will be able to identify possible issues, such as imbalance, misalignment, wear, mechanical looseness, and bearing and gear faults

The measurement data is securely transferred via satellite to the SKF One Global Cloud, where SKF’s Condition Monitoring (CM) expert remote diagnostic team can retrieve and analyse the assets data as part of its maintenance consulting services. Furthermore all data can easily be accessed by the chief engineer and fleet manager, closing the loop and involving the crew in the Condition-based maintenance process.

The SKF CM expert analysis output are the recommended actions of needed maintenance which are sent to the chief engineer to take the appropriate actions and to keep the assets running smooth and efficiently.

By introducing long term monitoring and machine efficiency evaluation techniques, the SKF Marine CM Route Kit allows industry professionals to adopt a centralised predictive maintenance programme across their entire fleets. Through the detection of the machine conditions that lead to failure, proactive remedial work can be carried out to extend maintenance intervals, eliminate potential breakdowns and ensure consistently high operational safety, while also enhancing service life and reducing repair costs considerably. In addition, it is possible to coordinate the service and spare parts supply to generate further cost savings.

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